A new statue of a tree believed to be Toyotomi Hideyoshi is the largest osaka ever

A new statue of a tree believed to be Toyotomi Hideyoshi is found in osaka May 21 at 23:28

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A new statue of a tree believed to have been created in the Edo period at a shrine in Asahi-ku, Osaka was newly found. It is the largest statue of Hideyoshi found in japan, and experts say it is a valuable discovery to show that Hideyoshi was secretly surrounded in Osaka in the Edo period.
The newly discovered wooden statue, believed to be Hideyoshi Toyotomi, is a wooden statue with a crown on its head and is lost, but it is 81.9 centimeters high.

According to the Osaka City Board of Education, it is the largest of the wooden statues that are believed to have carved hideyoshi’s figure found so far.

The wooden statue is carved on the face like a gentle old man with his eyes down, and it is believed that it was made in the Edo period after his death, rather than realistically depicting Hideyoshi in his life.

The wooden statue was found at Omiya Shrine in Asahi-ku, Osaka, and in accordance with the renovation work of the shrine hall, which had been closed by nailing the door for many years, it was found as a result of the city board of education’s first full-scale investigation from July.

After his death, Hideyoshi Toyotomi was deified, but it is believed that during the Tokugawa Shogunate period, he was no longer able to believe in the table.

Professor Yoichi Hase of Kansai University, who is familiar with the history of early modern sculpture, said, “It is a valuable discovery to show that faith was secretly continued in Osaka, where Hideyoshi’s influence was large under the Tokugawa Shogunate. It is thought that it will be an opportunity to tie the situation at that time by comparing it with the image found in other regions.”

TetsumiyaShi Hirose of Omiya Shrine said, “When Osaka Castle fell, there was a legend that it was secretly taken out and hidden in this shrine, but until now, it has been kept inside the shrine. As a result of the research, I am very surprised to find that it is valuable as a cultural property. Due to the effects of the new coronavirus, it has not been released to the public, but once this situation is settled, we will consider making repairs and considering the release.”