Fuel cell vehicles that make electricity using hydrogen as fuel Experiments to see if they can be used in the event of a disaster

Fuel cell vehicles that make electricity using hydrogen as fuel Experiments to see if they can be used in the event of a disaster September 1 at 6:23 a.m.

An experiment to see if “fuel cell vehicles” of vehicles that make electricity using hydrogen as fuel can be used as a power source in the event of a disaster will begin in September. It is likely to expand the use in the event of a disaster, including electric vehicles.

In recent natural disasters, electric vehicles are increasingly used as power sources for light and smartphone charging at evacuation centers in areas where power outages have occurred.

Under these circumstances, Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Honda Technical Research Institute will begin demonstration tests in September to see if fuel cell vehicles, which make electricity using hydrogen as fuel, can also be used as power supplies in the event of a disaster.

In the experiment, Toyota’s fuel cell bus, which is twice as much hydrogen as usual, is used to create electricity and save it to Honda’s batteries.

In addition to being able to cover the power of three days’ shelters with a capacity of about 50 people, it is also possible to carry it with a small battery, and the two companies will verify their needs and usability by having them use it by local governments in the event of a disaster.

Hiroyuki Eguchi, chief engineer at Honda Technical Research Institute, said, “With the continued vigilance against the new coronavirus, portable power supplies can also help prevent the “tight” state of shelters.”

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. has also signed an agreement with more than 50 local governments to utilize electric vehicles in the event of a disaster, and the movement to use cars as a power source is likely to spread further.