LDP presidential election: Mr. Kishida, Mr. Ishiba, and Mr. Kan

LDP presidential election: Mr. Kishida, Mr. Ishiba, and Mr. Kan will fight each other on September 1 at 7:06 p.m.

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Mr. Kishida, Chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, and former Secretary General Ishiba formally announced their candidacy for the LDP presidential election, which would replace Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

On the other hand, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan, who is supported by the Hosoda, Aso, and Nikai factions, is expected to announce his candidacy for the second day, solidifying a three-member dispute.

As for how the presidential election will be held, the party’s General Affairs Committee will not hold a party vote, but will decide to select a new president at the general meeting of members of both houses of parliament, and the date of the vote on the 14th of this month is expected to be decided on the second day.

Mr. Kishida and Mr. Ishiba officially announced their candidacy.

In the LDP presidential election to choose Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s successor, Chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee Kishida and former Secretary General Ishiba formally announced their candidacy at a press conference, respectively.

Mr. Kishida”: “We will fight for everything”

Mr. Kishida, Chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, told a press conference at 3 p.m., “I would like to spend all of my time fighting for the people and for the nation. In order to face various issues, it is necessary to cooperate with the people, and the ability to listen carefully to the voices of the people is also required. I would like to aim to be a leader who can draw the cooperation of the people,” he said, formally announcing that he would run for the presidential election to replace Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

He also said that the economy and diplomacy were his own areas of expertise, and said of the Abe administration’s policies, “We have achieved great results, but no policy is sweet enough to work for 10 or 20 years. Times are changing and we have to respond to them. I’m going to work new issues.

On the other hand, on the current intraparty situation surrounding the president’s election, Mr. Kishida said, “The point that it is very severe is correct. I will continue to make every effort to appeal carefully to reach each person’s heart and find a way to live.”

Ishiba: “Appeal without running away from the front”

Mr. Ishiba told a news conference at 4:30 p.m., “Politics that do not believe in the people should not be trusted by the people, but it is the responsibility of the next era to appeal sincerely, humbly, without running away from the front, and to execute policies with the consent and sympathy of the people. I would like to make all my efforts to actively and boldly work on it,” he said, announcing that he would run for the presidential election to replace Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

As for continuity from the Abe administration, he pointed out that “it is political stability that must be inherited,” while “stock prices and corporate profits have increased, but raising incomes for low-income earners has not been fully realized, and the problem of local employment and income is half way through.”

Regarding diplomacy, he said, “Prime Minister Abe’s efforts, such as relations with U.S. President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, have strengthened diplomatic relations. I would like to expand this to the relationship between the government and the government, the country, the people and the people, and work to strengthen the Japan-U.S. alliance and Japan-Russia relations and resolve the abduction issue.”

Mr. Kan to announce his candidacy tomorrow

On the other hand, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan held a press conference on the evening of February 2 to announce his candidacy, solidifying the three-party dispute.

Mr. Kan met with Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Taro Aso, who is the chairman of the Aso faction of the second faction in the party.
In this interview, Mr. Kan expressed his intention to run for office and asked for his support, while Mr. Aso expressed his intention to support him as a faction.

He also visited the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Organizing Committee in Chuo-ku, Tokyo, where he met with former Prime Minister Mori, who is the chairman of the organizing committee, for about 10 minutes.
In addition to announcing his intention to run for the LDP presidential election, he is 13th to ask for cooperation.

So far, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s largest faction in the party, the Hosoda faction, the Aso faction of the second faction, and the second floor faction of the fourth faction have decided to support Mr. Kan, and the Takeshita faction of the second faction has also discussed the response and will proceed with coordination in favor of Chief Cabinet Secretary Kan.

In addition, a group of members of the non-faction is expected to support Mr. Kan, and the spread of support for Mr. Kan is accelerating.

Foreign Minister Mogi’s idea to see off his candidacy

On the other hand, Mr. Mogi, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Japan, told senior officials of the Takeshita faction that he would forego his candidacy this time, in light of the decision to make adjustments in favor of Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan.

Defense Minister Kono’s idea of not running

After attending the general meeting of the Aso faction he belongs to in the evening of the day, Defense Minister Kono told reporters, “After consulting with my colleagues, I decided not to run for office this time. In the future, I would like to consult with Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Taro Aso, who is the chairman of the faction, and he indicated that he would not run for office.

Former Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications Noda’s idea to forgo the candidacy

Former Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications Seiko Noda, who had shown a willingness to run, also made clear to reporters that she would not hold a party member vote and decided to hold a general meeting of members of both houses to select a new president.

Mr. Shimomura and Mr. Inada will not run

Mr. Shimomura, the chairman of the election response committee, and Acting Secretary-General Inada, each expressed their not willingness to run for office in response to the hosoda faction to which the two members belonged to the policy of supporting Chief Cabinet Secretary Kan.

Decision to be held at the General Assembly of Members of both Houses without a vote of party members

Prior to the election of Mr. Kishida and Mr. Ishiba, the General Affairs Committee of the Party decided not to hold a vote on how to hold the presidential election, but to select a new president at the general assembly of members of both houses of congress.

The general meeting began shortly after 11 a.m. in a conference room on the 9th floor of the party headquarters and ended about two hours later before 1 p.m.

In this interview, Secretary-General Nikai and other party executives said, “There is also a response to the new coronavirus, and it is necessary to establish a new system and move forward with policies as soon as possible,” and proposed that a new president be selected by a vote of members of the Diet and representatives of prefectural associations by not conducting a party member’s vote.

On the other hand, there were opinions from those present, such as, “We should choose a new president as soon as possible, and it is inevitable that we will not vote for party members,” but there were also opinions calling for a vote by party members, such as, “We should widely reflect the opinions of party members in order to conduct presidential elections in an open way.”

In response, when deciding where to vote for representatives of prefectural coalitions, the executive branch presented a proposal to encourage each prefectural coalition to conduct preliminary elections and reflect the intentions of party members, and ultimately decided as proposed by the executive branch.

As a result, the LDP presidential election will be contested by 535 votes, including 394 votes for members of the Diet and 141 votes for three votes to 47 prefectures.

On the other hand, the schedule for the presidential election is expected to be decided after the executive branch is considering a proposal to vote on the 8th and 14th of this month, after being consulted by the Presidential Election Management Committee, etc., which will be held on February 2.

In addition, with regard to the extraordinary Diet session for which the prime minister will be elected, the Liberal Democratic Party will convene on the 16th of this month to coordinate with the opposition parties in the direction of holding elections within the same day, following the decision that the party conference of the new party, including the Constitutional Democratic Party and the People’s Democratic Party, will be held ahead of schedule.