LDP presidential election 3: Increased support

LDP Presidential Election 3: Movement to Expand Support September 3 19:27

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In the run-up to the LDP presidential election to choose Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s successor, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan attended a meeting of the camp of five factions supporting himself, while Mr. Kishida, the chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, announced a policy to appeal during the election campaign, and former Secretary General Ishiba also launched an election response headquarters to stimulate moves to expand support.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan

On the afternoon of March 3, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan visited the home of former President Tanigaki, a special adviser to the Tanigaki Group in Setagaya Ward, Tokyo, and asked for support in the election for president.

After this, Mr. Kan told reporters, “I asked you to support me.”

According to Mr. Makihara, Deputy Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry of the Tanigaki Group, Mr. Kan said, “We cannot destroy what Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has accumulated while we are worried about the corona and the economy,” while Mr. Tanigaki said, “I also have a sense that I am disabled and afraid of viruses. Mr. Kan’s candidacy, which has led the administration of the measures, gives the public a sense of security and I want him to do his best.”

The Tanigaki Group has decided to vote independently in this presidential election.

At a press conference in the afternoon after his visit to former President Tanigaki, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan said, “It is important to create a society in which people with disabilities and intractable diseases can demonstrate their individuality and play an active role in their work and community. We have been making buildings barrier-free and promoting employment of people with disabilities, but next year there will also be the Olympic and Paralympic Games, so we need to work hard.”

The five factions supporting Chief Cabinet Secretary Kan, the Hosoda, Aso, Takeshita, Nikai, and Ishihara factions, as well as members of the non-factions close to Mr. Kan, held a meeting in the evening following the morning to discuss how to respond to the inauguration of the election response headquarters.

Then, the head of the election response headquarters was appointed as the former chairman of the National Public Safety Committee, Mr. Kobtsuki, who is a non-faction. Mr. Kobtsuki is the third son of former Construction Minister Hikosaburo Ogaki, who served as Mr. Kan’s former secretary.
In addition, the Secretary-General will serve as the Head of the Yamaguchi Organized Movement of the Takeshita School, and the Secretary-General will be mr. Yoshikawa, former Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of the second floor.

In addition, we confirmed that the 20 candidates required for the candidacy will be divided according to the size of the members of the faction.

After the meeting, Yamaguchi told reporters, “We made it a simple system without the faction’s sleeves on the executives of the election response headquarters. We judged that it would be better not to be biased in order to unite and create a circle together.”

On a commercial broadcast program, Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan was asked about the dissolution of the House of Representatives and the general election, “If the prime minister decides, should we promptly question the public’s trust?” In the situation of coronats, the voice of the people is that we want them to take measures against coronas at all means, and I think this will tell them that this is coming to an end.”

On top of that, he said, “I don’t know who will be president, but I think it’s the judgment of the person who became it. However, if it is an environment, we should think objectively about what the people want the people to do in the corona.”

Masanori Kishida

Mr. Kishida, Chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, visited a hospital in Tokyo in the afternoon of March 3 to inspect the system for accepting people infected with the new coronavirus, exchange opinions with hospital officials, and share his thoughts on expanding PCR testing and financial support for medical institutions.

Mr. Kishida told reporters, “The first place on policy is the fight against the new coronavirus. The management of medical institutions is in a serious situation, and it is necessary to make firm efforts such as utilizing reserve costs. It is necessary to enhance the inspection system, including support for small and medium-sized enterprises.”

On that basis, Mr. Kishida said, “I visited to hear about the hardships of the field and to think about how politics would respond. I believe that sending out ideas on issues that the people are most interested in will reach members of the Diet and have a significant impact on the election of the president.”

Former Secretary General Ishiba

At a meeting of the factions, Mr. Ishiba said, “I would like to make a presidential election in which each candidate shows the party members and the people what Japan and the Liberal Democratic Party should be, and gains the public’s consent and sympathy in the national elections that will come soon. Democracy collapses from the bottom if people think that “politics is decided by some people” or “politicians think only of their own interests.” Before that happens, I want to fight this election with all my might.”

Mr. Ishiba’s camp set up an election headquarters at a hotel in Tokyo on the afternoon of March 3.

About 20 people attended the first meeting, including members of the Diet belonging to the Ishiba faction, former Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Watanabe of the no faction, and Mr. Asahiko Mihara, a member of the House of Representatives of the Takeshita faction.

At the meeting, mr. Yamamoto, former Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, who serves as the chairman of the Ishiba faction, was appointed as the head of the election response headquarters, and discussed strategies for winning local votes that the Ishiba camp expects, based on the preliminary elections being held in various regions.

After the meeting, Mr. Ishiba told reporters, “It’s a really refreshing and sunny feeling. We want to make it a meaningful battle for the people and the next era. I want to appeal with all my heart and soul what this country should be like.”