LDP presidential election debates on economic measures and reform of social security system Sunday debate

LDP presidential election debates on economic measures and reform of social security system Sunday debate September 13 at 1:05 p.m.

k10012615761_202009131214_202009131218.mp4
On April 14, former Secretary General Ishiba, Chief Cabinet Secretary Kan, and Chairman of the Kishida Political Affairs Research Committee, who are running for the LDP presidential election, held a debate on additional economic measures associated with the new coronavirus and reform of the social security system during NHK’s “Sunday Debate.”
Additional economic measures associated with the new coronavirus
Mr. Ishiba, the former secretary general, said, “Production facilities and people have not disappeared, but consumption has disappeared, so the economy will stall if we do not use all kinds of means with a view to issuing government bonds. It is important to increase the income of which layer, and if the income of low-income people increases, it will be used for consumption. Isn’t this an opportunity for the Corona Virus antivirus to change the way the economy as a whole works?”

Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan said, “The most important thing is to secure employment and continue the business of the company. The basic idea is to do everything you can as GDP declines from April to June, with the biggest post-war rate of decline and the situation of the new coronavirus still continuing. The reserve cost was piled up for that. In addition, economic measures are necessary if necessary in the future.”

Mr. Kishida, Chairman of the Research Committee, said, “We must continue our efforts to move people, goods, and money. The future is uncertain, and it should be fully considered that the use of reserves, further fiscal measures, and economic measures will be necessary. Now that countries around the world are spending large-scale fiscal spending and interest rates are low, we must not hesitate to do what we need.”

As part of their economic measures, all three of them showed negative thoughts about lowering the consumption tax rate.

In addition, regarding the future of the social security system,
Mr. Ishiba said, “In another 20 years, the number of elderly people will peak and we should recognize that it is not sustainable as it is now. National health insurance must be protected at all costs, but as risks such as cancer and adult diseases fall apart, it is necessary to think about the appropriate way of insurance for the times. We want to review the design and realize the happiness of each and every one of us.”

Mr. Kan said, “As the declining birthrate and aging society continue, we will be able to work until the age of 70 in order to support people who are supported. It is important to review the overall structure and put it into practice, such as extending the age of pension benefits and focusing on prevention of medical expenses.” On that basis, he said, “One of the decisions will be on the status of the infection of the new coronavirus at the end of this year,” regarding the final report on all-generational social security.

Mr. Kishida said, “We would like to think about sustainability first by considering the burden based on the ability to pay rather than the burden according to age, social security, which allows us to choose the age at which pensions start, and the use of private vitality in the medical and nursing care fields. On that basis, I would like to consider the tax system, including the consumption tax, in relation to the public finances.”

On the other hand, Mr. Kan said of personnel affairs after the president’s election, “If I become prime minister, I would basically like to appoint people who are willing to reform. We must break down the “vertical allocation of government offices” and proceed with regulatory reform. I would like to make use of such motivated people to create a Cabinet that will be good for the people.”

Former Secretary General Ishiba “I want to do my best”

Mr. Ishiba, the former secretary general, told reporters, “It is an election until the lid of the ballot box closes, and I want to do my best until the end. I’ve been supported by a lot of people, and I want to go so to the point where I can’t do it any more. We must make an appeal to the end to regain the “convincing and empathy” that is being lost among the people and party members.”

Chief Cabinet Secretary Kan “fights the election of a president without regrets”

Chief Cabinet Secretary Naoto Kan told reporters, “Without the vitality of the region, there is no vitality of the country,” and he has made concrete progress, such as creating a hometown tax payment system when he was Minister of Internal Affairs and Communications. If it is predominant in the election campaign, isn’t it an expectation for such a thing? We will fight the president’s election with no regrets until the end.”

Mr. Kishida, Chairman of the Research Committee, “I want to continue working with my comrades”

Mr. Kishida, chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, told reporters, “I realized that I had to appeal to my own thoughts, not as chairman of the Political Affairs Research Committee, and in the second half of the war, I was able to communicate my thoughts and political stance firmly. I want to continue working with my comrades until the end.”