Successful production of “mini-heart” from ES cells in mice Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Successful production of “mini-heart” from ES cells in mice Tokyo Medical and Dental University September 13 at 5:23 a.m.

A group at Tokyo Medical and Dental University has announced that it has succeeded for the first time in making a “mini-heart” that actually moves about 1 millimeter from the “ES cells” of mice that can change into various cells.
This study was announced by a group of Professor Fumitoshi Ishino of Tokyo Medical and Dental University.

ES cells produced from fertilized eggs can be changed into various cells in the body and are also called universal cells along with iPS cells of the same properties.

In the group, ES cells in mice were cultured in addition to a high concentration of a special protein called laminin, which is often found when the fetus’ heart is made.

As a result, ES cells, while changing into cardiomyocytes, etc., gathered three-dimensionally, and after about two weeks, a small heart-like structure of about 1 mm in diameter was formed.

This “mini-heart” is equipped with a atrial and a heart chamber, and it beats like a real heart, which is a structure similar to the heart of a mouse fetus.

According to the group, it is the first time in the world that the three-dimensional structure has succeeded in producing a reproduced heart.

Prof. Ishino said, “In the future, we would like to study whether iPS cells in humans can do mini-hearts in the same way, and to elucidate the mechanism by which the heart can be. If the heart can be artificially produced, it could be applied to the evaluation of drug safety.”