Progress in Peace Talks Uncertainty Taliban Side “Governing by Islamic Law”

Progress in peace talks uncertainty Taliban side ruled by Islamic law September 14 at 5:31 a.m.

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As the government and the insurgent Taliban held their first talks to make peace in Afghanistan, a senior Taliban official told NHK that the talks aimed at governing the country under Islamic law. In response, Officials in the Afghan government have expressed concern that the fundamentalist idea of Islam would hinder negotiations, and it is unclear whether the talks will progress.
With regard to Afghanistan, the government and the Taliban are holding their first talks in Doha, the capital of Qatar in the Middle East, to achieve peace, and the focus will be on whether they can end the fighting that followed the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States.

Under these circumstances, Shail Shahyen, a senior Taliban official who is participating in the negotiations, made it clear in an interview with NHK that he was considering the terms for a ceasefire, and said that “the important agenda is the establishment of a thorough system based on Islamic law,” and made clear his plan to proceed with talks aimed at governing the country under Islamic law.

He also stated that “consultations should be advanced by the hands of the afghan people,” and indicated that he would not allow third countries, such as the United States, to intervene in the talks, while avoiding name-mentioning them.

In response, Officials in the Afghan government have expressed concern that the Taliban’s fundamentalist view of Islam could hinder negotiations, and it is unclear whether talks will progress in the future.

Taliban regime

During its five-year administration until 2001, the Taliban took policies that interpreted Islam extremely harshly, restricted art and entertainment, and severely restricted women’s rights, including banning women from working and education.

In 2001, he blew up the Great Buddha of Bamiyan, a world-famous Buddhist site, and came to international criticism, claiming that idolatry was contrary to Islamic teachings.

Some citizens have expressed concern that if the Taliban were to return to power in the future through talks toward peace, Islam’s fundamentalist policies would be taken again and freedom would be restricted.