Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo “Still Genocide and Sexual Violence”

Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo “Still Genocide and Sexual Violence” September 29 at 5:50 AM

An online seminar was held to consider the on-called conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in central Africa, and participants were asked to clarify their responsibilities in international courts and other places, as massacres of civilians and sexual violence against women are still taking place.
Based on testimony, a report on conflict damage in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, released in 2010 by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, systematically summarized for the first time 617 serious human rights violations, including the massacre of civilians and sexual violence against women, and was one of the reasons for the international community’s interest in the conflict at the time.

Ten years after the release of the report, a Japanese NPO held an online seminar to think about the conflict.

In this report, Jean-Claude Maswana, a professor at Ritsumeikan University who is from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, criticized the indifference of the international community, including Japan, by pointing out that “the report contains the actual conditions of genocide and sexual violence, but the world remains silent.”

Shar Onana, who is familiar with conflicts in Africa, said “crimes against violence and human rights violations should be judged” and called for the whereabouts of responsibility to be clarified in international courts and other judicial offices.

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, fighting continues between government forces and armed groups over the interests of underground resources, and more than millions are said to have been killed.

Nobel Peace Prize Dr. Mukwege “It is important to be discussed”

Dr. Deni mukwege of the Democratic Republic of the Congo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2018 for the treatment of women who have been victims of sexual violence by armed groups and other groups.

Dr. Mukwege told NHK in August that “the massacre is still going on. It is very important that this report be taken up and discussed,” he said, re-criticizing the current situation, which has not changed ten years after the report was released.