The Science Council of Japan to submit a request to the Prime Minister, explain the reason and ask for the appointment of six people

The Science Council of Japan to submit a request to the Prime Minister Explain the reason and ask for the appointment of six people October 3 18:26

In response to the failure of Prime Minister Kan to appoint six of the candidates, the Science Council of Japan, which is made up of Japanese scientists, has decided to request an explanation of why he was not appointed and to submit a request for the appointment of six members to Prime Minister Kan.
The Science Council of Japan is an institution representing Japanese scientists who make policy proposals independently of the government, and as a member to be appointed as of the first day of this month, the Academic Council submitted a list recommending 105 candidates, but Prime Minister Kan did not appoint six of them.

The Science Council of Japan held a meeting of executives on March 3 and decided to submit to Prime Minister Kan an explanation of why the candidate for the recommended member would not be appointed and a request for the prompt appointment of six people who were not appointed.

The request form will be placed on the website of the Academic Conference and submitted via the department in charge of the country by e-mail.

The Science Council of Japan has been discussing the response of this matter urgently in the general meeting and subcommittee held from the 1st of this month.

After the board meeting, Professor Takaaki Shibata of the University of Tokyo, who is the president of the Science Council of Japan, said, “If you don’t know why you weren’t appointed, you can’t respond. I would like to submit a request as soon as possible.”

Protests are also being “attacked by japanese academics as a whole”

As for Prime Minister Kan’s failure to appoint six of the members of the Science Council of Japan, a protest was held in front of the Prime Minister’s Office on March 3, and one person who was not appointed, Masanori Okada, a professor at Waseda University, said, “We must recognize that japanese academics as a whole are being attacked.”

The protest was called by a professor at Waseda University on social media, and about 300 people participated in the organizer’s announcement.

One person who was not appointed, Professor Masanori Okada of Waseda University, also showed up and said, “From the purpose of the law, there is no room for the prime minister to have discretion in his personnel rights, and he cannot refuse the appointment. And the government says it won’t explain the reasons for human resources, but it’s not about human resources, it’s about the relationship between politics and science. We must recognize that japanese academics as a whole are being attacked.”

A male university student who participated said, “I felt a sense of crisis that academic freedom was about to be destroyed. I think the government’s response is dishonest, so I want you to explain why you eliminated the six.”

Prof. Okada said, “I hope that Prime Minister Kan will admit and correct mistakes as soon as possible so as not to distort Japanese academics and leave a root in the future.”