Remdessivir “Reduced Patient Recovery Time” Clinical Trial Final Report

Remdessivir “Reduced Patient Recovery Period” Final Report of Clinical Trials October 9 at 7:31 AM

A group of researchers, including the National Institutes of Health, published a final report of an international clinical trial of the antiviral drug Rendesivir, expressing the view that it could reduce the time it takes to recover patients with the new coronavirus and prevent it from being severe.
A group of researchers, including the NiH-National Institutes of Health in the United States, published the final report of an international clinical trial of the antiviral drug Lemdessivir today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

As a result, the study was conducted on approximately 1,000 adults hospitalized with the new coronavirus infection in 10 countries, including the United States and Japan, and compared the course of lemdesivir with those who had been administered for up to 10 days and those who did not.

As a result, the median time it takes for the patient to recover to a certain degree in the administered group was 10 days, which was shorter than the 15 days of the group that did not administer, and the degree of recovery on the 15th day from the start of administration was also better.

For this reason, the research group shows that it can be expected to reduce the time it takes to recover patients with the new coronavirus and prevent it from being severe.

Remdessivir was approved by special cases in Japan in May, but in the United States it remains an emergency permit for use and has not been formally approved.

However, it is also known that it was recently administered to President Trump infected with the new coronavirus, and the movement toward approval is expected to accelerate in the United States in response to this result.

EU purchase agreement for up to 500,000 people

As for the antiviral drug Remdessivir, the EU-European Union announced today that it has signed a contract with an American pharmaceutical company to develop drugs to buy up to 500,000 people.

As a result, the purchase amount will be 700 billion euros, more than 8.7 billion yen in Japanese yen, and 36 countries including countries that have signed agreements to jointly procure medical supplies such as the United Kingdom and Norway will be offered to EU member states.

The EU has already purchased about 30,000 Remdesivirs at the moment, but since the infection is spreading again in many countries, it was considering buying significantly more.

Mr Kiriakides, who is in charge of health policy in the EU, said it “shows Europe’s unity with the new coronavirus.”