Azerbaijan and Armenia voice concern over implementation of ceasefire agreement

Azerbaijan and Armenia voice concern over implementation of ceasefire agreement October 11 at 4:45 a.m.

Azerbaijan and Armenia, the former Soviet Union, which have been fighting over the disputed province of Nagorno-Karabakh, have agreed to a ceasefire from the 10th, but they have insisted on each other that there was an attack even after the ceasefire came into force, and there are growing concerns that the agreement will be implemented reliably.
Azerbaijan and Armenia have agreed to a ceasefire from noon on October 10 local time, brokered by Russia after nearly two weeks of massive fighting over the disputed province of Navarno-Karabakh.

However, after the ceasefire came into force, Armenia announced that southern cities had been attacked by missiles, and Azerbaijan also announced that troops and western cities deployed around the autonomous province had been shelled.

While the two countries deny that they are “not attacking,” they have insisted on each other’s violations of the ceasefire and have responded with recried accusations.

Against this situation, Azerbaijan’s Foreign Minister Bayramov met by telephone with Turkey’s Foreign Minister Chaushor, who supports Azerbaijan, and said that “the ceasefire is temporary, declared for humanitarian purposes, such as the exchange of prisoners of war.”

In response, Foreign Minister Chaushor also responded that the ceasefire is an important step but not a permanent solution, and there are growing concerns that the ceasefire agreement will be implemented reliably.