“Infant shake syndrome” acquittal one after another society is a new view

“Infant shake syndrome” acquittal one after another society new view October 12 12:14

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In the case of abuse in which “infant shake syndrome” became a point of contention, the Japanese Academy of Pediatrics has compiled a new view in the afterglow of acquittals. Medical professionals are calling for “unabased and appropriate response” if they suspect abuse in order to ensure the safety of their children, saying they have been carefully diagnosed on medical grounds whether the child’s head injuries were caused by abuse.
In the past few years, there have been a series of acquittals across the country over the past few years, including the possibility that the same symptoms may occur in falls and illnesses in cases of abuse in which “infant shake syndrome” that causes head injuries such as violent shaking has become a point of contention.

Against this perspective, the Japanese Academy of Pediatrics has compiled a new official view on child head injuries and abuse.

As a result, head injuries that occur by intentionally adding strong force to children under the age of five, including “infant shake syndrome,” are called “AHT,” and many academic organizations in Japan and abroad have acknowledged this idea on medical grounds.

On top of that, there is criticism that abuse is mechanically judged only by three symptoms that are characteristic, such as subdural hematoma, although it is “difficult to completely deny” the possibility that such cases existed in the past, it is now carefully diagnosed, such as comprehensive judgment by a team of experts.

In addition, regarding the possibility of similar symptoms caused by accidents and illnesses in judicial situations and in the press, specific symptoms were explained, and there was no medical validity, such as not sufficient grounds.

Medical personnel involved in children strongly hope that they will respond appropriately without being afraid to notify the child guidance center if they suspect “AHT” in order to protect their children’s safety.

The Academy of Pediatrics has decided to post its views on its website.