International Agreement on the Principles of Space Activities with a View to the “Artemis Project” of Lunar Exploration

International Agreement on the Principles of Space Activities with a View to the “Artemis Project” of lunar exploration October 14 at 5:35 a.m.

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With a view to the Artemis Project, in which Japan participates and explores the moon, the signing ceremony of the international agreement, which defines principles for working in space, was held, and Mr. Inoue, Minister of Science and Technology, showed his expectation that it would be a guide for the creation of international rules in the future.
The signing ceremony was held online early on the 14th of Japan time, and a total of eight countries, including Japan, Canada, and the United Kingdom, participated in the U.S. call.

The agreement, which stipulates principles for working in space with a view to the Artemis Project, an international project in which Japan participates and explores the moon, calls for ensuring activities and transparency for peaceful purposes, as well as the collection and use of space resources.

According to the Cabinet Office, although the agreement is not legally binding, it will be japan’s first international framework for activities such as lunar exploration.

At the signing ceremony, Science and Technology Minister Inoue, who is in charge of space policy, said, “I hope that the principles set out in this agreement will be a great guide for the creation of international rules for future space activities. We look forward to working with our international partners.”

What is the background of the agreement?

The purpose of this agreement is to create an international rule framework to create an environment for exploration and resource use on the moon by the government and companies.

Water, which is expected to be on the moon, can be used as drinking water, and hydrogen obtained by decomposition is expected to be used as a resource, and countries such as the United States, China, and Japan have launched exploration plans.

On the other hand, since there are no international orders, there were concerns that there would be trouble among countries and other countries that are working on the plan.

Therefore, while each country has the right to freely collect and use resources, the agreement calls for safe space development without interfering with other countries’ people and equipment.

In addition, there are items to preserve traces of past activities, and the United States is expected to preserve the footprints and some of the landers left in the Apollo Program around 1970 as a historical heritage.

In addition to implementing it for peaceful purposes, it also includes sharing space policies and intentions of each country to ensure transparency.

This is an agreement between Japan, the United States, and European countries, but for the United States, which led the way, there seems to be an initiative to control China, which is promoting its own space development, including lunar exploration.