Taliban official calls on U.S. to “fulfill peace agreement” in presidential election

Taliban official calls on U.S. to “fulfill peace agreement” November 10 at 4:27 a.m.

With former Vice President Biden of the Democratic Party declaring victory in the U.S. presidential election, a senior Afghan insurgent Taliban official told NHK that he would seek the U.S. side to steadily implement the peace agreement, including the full withdrawal of U.S. troops stationed there.
The United States and the Taliban signed for the first time a peace agreement in February, including the complete withdrawal of U.S. troops stationed in Afghanistan, and military withdrawal is underway there.

“We expect the peace agreement signed with the United States to be steadily implemented and further advanced, regardless of the election results,” Mohammad Naim, a senior Taliban official and reporter, told NHK. The agreement should be observed and no changes will be allowed,” he said, stressing the idea of calling on the United States to implement the peace agreement, including the full withdrawal of troops.

In Afghanistan, where U.S. military operations have continued since the 2001 terrorist attacks, President Trump pledged to withdraw early, but as former Democratic Vice President Biden declared victory in the presidential election and accelerated the move toward a transition to power, the focus will be on whether the agreement can be steadily implemented between the new administration and the Taliban in the future.

Peace and Security in Afghanistan

In an aim to end military operations in Afghanistan since the 2001 terrorist attacks, the Trump administration in the United States signed its first peace agreement in February with the insurgent Taliban and Qatar in the Middle East.

The agreement includes the complete withdrawal of U.S. troops, but as a condition, the Taliban is calling on the Taliban to cut off relations with all groups that threaten U.S. security, such as the international terrorist organization al-Qaeda, and not to make Afghanistan a hotbed of terrorism again.

On the other hand, in response to the peace agreement, the Afghan government and the Taliban began talks for a permanent ceasefire in September, but there was a conflict of opinion over the terms of the ceasefire, and progress in the talks has not been expected.

Against this end, fierce fighting and terrorism have been repeated in various parts of Afghanistan, and according to the United Nations, about 6,000 civilians lost their lives or were injured in fighting from January to September.

In addition, as the spread of the new coronavirus, doctors and other healthcare professionals are constantly being hit by fighting and terrorism, and the United Nations is appealing for a speedy suspension of fighting and the protection of civilians.

In Afghanistan, as the withdrawal of U.S. troops stationed in response to the peace agreement is underway, the Taliban’s offensive is intensifying, and the rise of the extremist group IS-Islamic State has made the restoration of security a major issue.