France on out-of-the-way restrictions spread concerns about retail and restaurants before Christmas

Restrictions on outings in France November 16 at 4:48 a.m. spreading concerns about retail and dining options before Christmas

In France, where the spread of the new coronavirus is spreading again and uniform outing restrictions are in place across the country, more than 600,000 new infections have been confirmed this month alone, increasing the burden on the medical field and being forced to respond, while concerns are growing among retailers and restaurants that are unable to open normal business every year during the period of increased sales ahead of Christmas.

More than 600,000 new infections confirmed this month alone

In France, the spread of the new coronavirus is spreading again rapidly, and there are uniform outing restrictions across the country, the first since spring since the 30th of last month.

However, more than 600,000 new infections have been confirmed this month alone, and more than 3,000 new people are hospitalized on many days, increasing the burden on the medical field.

The government is busy responding by increasing the number of beds in the intensive care room by 1360 beds and transporting critically ill patients to relatively comfortable areas and hospitals in neighboring Germany.

On the other hand, at this time of year when sales are increasing every year ahead of Christmas, concerns are growing among retailers and restaurants that are unable to conduct regular business with customers in the store due to out-of-home restrictions, and there are growing calls for the restrictions to be relaxed.

Bookstore sales decline, support movement

The Christmas season in France is considered to be the most consumed time of the year.

Bookstores are also concerned about the impact of the restrictions on going out, as sales increase significantly at this time of the year due to the number of people who choose books as Christmas gifts.

Marieb Sharbnier, who owns a bookstore near Paris, said she lost nearly 50 percent of her sales due to the outing limit that lasted nearly two months in spring, so she said, “Our job is to recommend the right books while interacting with visitors. The restrictions on going out are unfair and cannot be accepted.”

Behind the appeal for unfairness is the presence of Amazon, a major online shopping company lying in demand during the spring out-of-home restrictions.

The French bookstore association said in a statement that it was “regrettable to allow the sale of books only online, which is controlled by Amazon,” and appealed for support to bookstores.

A major Supermarket in France advertised in a newspaper under the heading “Amazon, I’m sorry” and offered to cooperate with bookstores to make their online sales sites available for free.

The French government has also announced a support measure to make books virtually free of charge when bookstores send books by mail.

At Charbnier’s bookstore, the number of people who order books on the Internet in advance and receive them at the store has increased significantly, so he thanked “customers trying to support us through the purchase of books” and said that he wanted to resume normal business as soon as possible.