Saitama Prefecture surveyed 1 out of 25 high school students who are “young care workers” who are responsible for nursing care

One in 25 high school students of “Young Carer” who is responsible for nursing care Saitama Prefecture survey November 22 0:28

A Saitama Prefecture survey found that one in 25 high school students had so-called “young care workers” of children under the age of 18 who were responsible for caring for their families. This is the first large-scale survey of this issue in Japan, and Saitama Prefecture is considering measures to support the development of a consultation system.
“Young Carer” is children under the age of 18 who are responsible for the care of their families, and Saitama Prefecture conducted a survey of about 55,000 second-year high school students in saitama Prefecture this year in order to understand the actual situation, and obtained responses from approximately 90%.

In the survey, 10 items such as “doing laundry, cooking, and other household chores on behalf of the family” and “taking care of others” were given in the present or past, and when asked if they were “young carers,” 4.1% found that this was the case. It will be up to one in 25 people.

When asked about the impact on their lives, 42% said they had no effect, while 19% said they felt lonely, 17% felt stressed, and 10% did not have enough time to study.

In addition, 35% of people answered “every day” about the number of nursing care.

This is the first large-scale survey of young carers in Japan, and Saitama Prefecture is considering measures to support the development of consultation systems based on the results of this survey.

What is “Young Careler”?

“Young Careler” is a child under the age of 18 who is responsible for caring for his or her family.

If the family needs nursing care due to illness or disability, and there are no other adults to support, they will be responsible for household chores.

Children called young carers face problems such as being forced to take care of themses on a daily hand and hindering their learning and employment.

However, it is difficult to grasp the actual situation due to events in the home, and there are many cases where children themselves are difficult to raise their voices or do not know where to ask for help when they are in trouble, and problems are difficult to surface.

Expert “It’s not a number that can be taken lightly”

Associate Professor Yoshie Kuwashima of the Faculty of Health Care, Osaka Dental University, who has been studying “Young Carer,” said of the survey results, “It is not a number that can be taken lightly when thinking that there is one young career in a high school class.”

On top of that, he said, “The difficulty of young carer children’s lives is related to children’s human rights, and it is an issue that the government should take measures against. We should take measures quickly, such as creating a place to stay so as not to be isolated, learning support, and diet support.”